SilverBoot sterling silver jewelry 925 of Taxco, Mexico, artists and designs, also in 950 britannia silver and 999 pure.
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Hallmarks - Foreign and American

There is a misunderstanding about what a hallmark really is. People confuse hallmarks with makers' marks. A hallmark is an indication of metal content, a guarantee of purity or quality, which may include a maker's mark and other marks. Makers' marks alone are not considered hallmarks. Hallmarks are most often found on precious metal objects. Not all good jewelry has hallmarking. Hallmarked jewelry can tell of country of origin and date of manufacture.

Often the hallmark is made up of several elements including: the type of metal, the maker and the year of the marking.

With the advent of globalization, free trade and the Internet, finding the problematic solution to the standardization of world hallmarking has become increasingly important.

In Mexico after World War II, with the rising popularity of silver jewelry and objects made in Taxco, Mexico, the Mexican government issued an assay mark guaranteeing the fineness to be 925 or higher. This mark is referred to as the "spread eagle" mark. The original mark did look like an eagle, but with modifications over the years, the mark was simplified. The number inside the mark is a workshop or city designation. In 1979, this mark was abandoned in favor of a series of registry letters and numbers assigned to individuals and workshops. Today, Mexican silver has regained its popularity, with a commensurate rise in value of period pieces by the sought-after makers and designers.

The "Mexico Silver" or "Silver Made in Mexico" marks are seen on pieces from the 1920's through mid 1940's, their silver standard varies, but is commonly above .925 purity.

The stamp on the reverse of Mexican silver indicates its silver content, country of origin and makers. The content is usually .925 for sterling silver and .950 for fine silver. The country maybe marked MEX or MEXICO. The markers mark maybe a name or a registration mark. The registration mark includes a T for Taxco, a letter indicating the first letter of the markers last name and a number that indicates the person is the x number registered under that initial. For example TR-120 would indicate the 120th person whose last name begins in R who is registered in Taxco.

Sterling Silver is 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper, in the USA it's stamped Sterling. Goods made for international trade are often marked .925.

In the USA, The National Gold and Silver Marketing Act does not require precious metals to be marked with quality. If a quality mark is used, the Act requires trademarks from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO). But many regularly used marks on American jewelry are not registered trademarks because registering a US trademark is expensive and requires usage vigilance.

American Hallmarking

Some early American maker's marks bear a striking resemblance to British hallmarks. Most American maker's marks can be found in Dorothy Rainwater's American Jewelry Manufacturers.

After World War II, with the rising popularity of silver jewelry and objects made in Taxco, Mexico, the Mexican government issued an assay mark guaranteeing the fineness to be 925 or higher. This mark is referred to as the "spread eagle" mark. The original mark did look like an eagle, but with modifications over the years, the mark was simplified. The number inside the mark is a workshop or city designation. In 1979, this mark was abandoned in favor of a series of registry letters and numbers assigned to individuals and workshops. Today, Mexican silver has regained its popularity, with a commensurate rise in value of period pieces by the sought-after makers and designers.

The first law regulating the stamping of silver products was enacted by the Massachusetts legislature in 1894, to be followed by Congress in 1906 with the National Stamping Act effective June 13, 1907 for regulating the marking and stamping of silver products.

Sterling Silver is 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper, in the USA it's stamped Sterling. Goods made for international trade are often marked .925.

The 1906 act required that any product marked "sterling" must contain 925 per 1000 parts pure silver and 900 per 1000 parts pure silver for "coin" silver, permitting a divergence of only 4 parts per 1000 from this standard. An amendment in 1961 required the maker's trademark be stamped next to the silver standard mark.

German Silver, Indian Silver, Montana Silver, or simply Silver do not guarantee any silver content. German Silver is the alloy of Copper, Nickel and Zinc, called Nickel Silver.

In the USA, The National Gold and Silver Marketing Act DOES NOT require precious metals to be marked with quality. If a quality mark is used, the Act the trademarks from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO). But many regularly used marks on American jewelry are not registered trademarks because registering a US trademark is expensive and requires usage vigilance.

1. US Federal law does not require precious metal to be marked with a quality stamp.

2. Some European countries DO require marking.

3. If goods are quality marked, US law requires a maker's mark in the form of a hallmark or registered trademark with the quality mark.

We guarantee our sterling silver products. They are solid sterling silver and are not plated or lacquered. Our casting company is located in the United States and all casting and finishing of our products is done in the United States. At this time, our sterling silver products are not marked because of the requirements outlined above.


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